Our Work

HealthConnect One applies an equity focused approach to improving pregnancy, birth and early parenting experiences for communities that have been historically marginalized and inadequately served

The First 1,000 Days

The first 1,000 days, from pregnancy through the first almost three years of every child’s life, presents a unique window of time and an opportunity to create the foundations for optimum health and development. Pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding and parenting in the first 1,000 days affect how our brains work, how young children respond to stress, and how we form trusting relationships.

HealthConnect One informs and supports people in communities experiencing marginalization due to race/ethnicity, socio-economic status, culture and/or language so they can be informed about the first 1,000 days. We develop programs rooted in community and provide training for frontline staff so that:

  • Mothers have support during pregnancy, attend their doctor appointments and can have support during labor and birth
  • Families bond with their newborn and get support for breastfeeding and healthy food options
  • Children and caregivers have access to psychosocial supports, understand early learning and reduce stress in the home as much as possible

HealthConnect One applies an equity focused approach to all of our work.  We aim to improve pregnancy, birth and early parenting experiences for communities that have been historically marginalized and inadequately served.

Five Essential Components

HealthConnect One programs rely on five essential components:

  1. Employ women who are trusted members of the target community
  2. Extend and intensify the peer support role from early pregnancy into the postpartum period
  3. Collaborate with community stakeholders and institutions, using a diverse team approach
  4. Facilitate experiential learning using popular education techniques and the HC One training curriculum
  5. Value the community health worker’s role

We provide a wide range of coaching, training, technical assistance, and program development services to our partners in the field of maternal and child health, and we take action and share knowledge with Community-Based Doulas, Breastfeeding Peer Counselors & other CHWs so birth workers’ voices are heard.

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When we speak to mothers, they tell us they are more comfortable seeing community health workers than their ob-gyns. The reason is simple: community health workers are more accessible because they belong to the community in which they work; their experience mirrors that of the mothers they are supporting.

“Philanthropy Can Make a Difference in Helping Black and Brown Mothers Survive Childbirth,” Chronicle of Philanthropy